sculpture face-to-face,Oslo

Making Standards Your Own

This is the third instalment of a presentation I made at the Montreal NAI/IC Conference in May, 2015. You can find part one here. Be prepared for a little conflict when embarking on a standards exercise. There are a few strong lessons I learned from the evaluation project, and I have applied them since to other initiatives. First, be prepared to open a can of […]

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surfers at long beach

Values: The Key to Market Segmentation

Values are the most important criterion of all. This is the fourth instalment in an ongoing discussion on social science for interpretive planners and visitor experience professionals. Part one is here.  The last few years have seen a real shift among market researchers away from simple demographics toward psychographics: identifying segments of society by their identity-based social values. This is based on the idea that different groups of […]

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trout lily

An Interpretation Conference, Tweeted

Last week, I attended the International Conference on Interpretation in Montreal, co-produced by Interpretation Canada and the National Association for Interpretation. It was a very good conference. In case you weren’t able to attend (or were there and want to re-live it), here is the conference in its entirety as communicated by the Twittersphere. Enjoy. https://storify.com/donenright/international-interpretation-conference-montreal-2  

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delphine lalaurie house

New Orleans: Once More With Five Feelings

Editor’s note: I’m thrilled to host this new post by my friend and colleague, Doug Heaney  The Top 5 Feelings You’ll Have in New Orleans by Doug Heaney Recently, my partner and I found ourselves in New Orleans to catch a cruise down to the Western Caribbean. And as much as we enjoyed the cruise part of the trip, the time we tacked on pre- and […]

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town crier, london

Quantifying Sparkle, Part 2

Defining standards for personal interpretive programs This is part two . You should probably start with Part One, here.  A few years ago, I was approached by one of the premier interpretive facilities in western Canada. The director of visitor experience had just hired a new manager of interpretation who was young and brilliant. With the change in management, she wanted to set a baseline and document […]

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older woman of Tahiti

Seniors: The Grey-haired Revolution

It’s all about the fun of discovery I just spent seven months living in a floating seniors’ facility. It was a blast. Well, to be technically correct, it was a cruise ship and I was a guest presenter. Each cruise lasted about 14 nights, and before we sailed, I would look at the demographic breakdown of the new guests. On most of our cruises, the average age […]

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cyclists

Understanding Our Markets: Ways of Segmenting

This is the third piece in a series of instalments about social science for interpreters, and interpretive planners, and visitor experience professionals. Find the first instalment here.  There are many ways of understanding our audiences and segmenting them into groups. Do these look familiar to you? Demography: What life stage are your visitors (age, family and marital status)? What is their education level? What is their […]

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panel with bad comma

Of Commas and Wurlies

Here’s an interpretive panel on the outskirts of Adelaide, Australia: Let’s address the obvious, first. What on EARTH is a wurly? Let’s ask Wictionary. wurly (plural wurlies) An Australian indigenous shelter made from small branches with leaves still attached. Phew, I’m glad that’s out of the way. Now, before we get all shirty about the use of jargon in interpretive panels, we should look at the possibility that this was a conscious choice. Perhaps the […]

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Segmentation, Profiling and the Role of Free Will

Editor’s note: This is part two of a series, Understanding Our Audiences, intended for anyone who does planning in the interpretive or visitor experience sectors. You can find the first instalment here.  It all sounds like marketing-speak. In fact, it’s pure old-school interpretation. Market segmentation is based on the idea that your behaviour and your tastes are predicted, to some extent, by your life stage (age, […]

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